Hidd'n Blue

(2009)

by Francisco Coll

Description
orchestra
Duration
4 1/2
Genres
Orchestral
Instrumentation
picc.2.3.ca.2.bcl.2.cbsn - 4331 - timp - perc(3): glsp/vib/xyl/mar/t.bells/crot/c.bells/susp.cym/crash.cym/sizz.cym/Chinese.cym/hi-hat.cym/2 tgl/2 temple blocks/ratchet/cabasa/sleigh bells/plastic bag full of crinkled paper/roto-t/tom-t/conga/snare drum/BD/tam- harp - pno - strings
Commission
Commissioned for the London Symphony Orchestra through the LSO Discovery Panufnik Young Composers Scheme, supported by the Helen Hamlyn Trust.
First Performance
FP: 15.1.12, Barbican Hall, London, UK: London Symphony Orchestra/Thomas Adès
Availability

score and parts for hire

Programme Notes
‘3D music for a virtuoso orchestra of the 21st century.’ This is Francisco Coll García’s vivid description of his LSO premiere. Hidd’n Blue (which he also describes as ‘a kind of overture for large orchestra’) marks another stage of what is already an impressive career. As Coll describes it, ‘the sound world of this piece is colourful – rhythmic excitement, vibrant tone, startling harmonies – and builds to a vertiginous climax. As the title suggests, a base note of deep, mysterious blue has been overlaid with swirling, lighter colours, and the lines of music function like the trees whose branches repeatedly divide in counterpoint to the base shade.’ Structurally, Hidd'n Blue ‘begins as an unconventional canon and inventively develops the material until the climax, which is like a developed canon.’ As his fragmented canon emerges through the surface excitement, Coll sculpts his orchestral forces, explaining that he ‘exploits the dramatic range between high and low notes, between forte and piano – and gradually drawing the listener to the softer, subdued melody beneath.’ Listeners may find that the piece insists on the opposition between both high and deep notes and between pianissimo and fortissimo. Coll’s exploration of the union of opposites is more than a musical device – it represents a response to what he sees as an era in which ‘only the extremes are important to society.’ In Hidd’n Blue, he says, ‘everything seems safe and unbalanced at the same time.’ (David Jays)

Licensing Information

News & Reviews

Site Search

Newsletter sign-up

Submit your email address here to receive the latest news and special offers from Faber Music

Take a look

Carl Davis

'Carl Davis has made an astonishing impact on music in Britain. He has performed an integral role in the...

read more